In Other News

Water supply still a big issue for Newhall Ranch: Guest commentary

By Lynne Plambeck|

Will Trump really do Harvey recovery right? Guest commentary

During his first Texas trip to bring assurance to residents and government officials that the federal government was ready to offer whatever assistance was needed in the wake of Hurricane Harvey and the disastrous flooding that followed, President Don...

By Ralph E. Shaffer|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Opinion

    Editorial cartoon of the day

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  • Columns

    Trump’s presidency has been good for Brad Sherman: Guest commentary

    The first time I met Congressman Brad Sherman, it was a frustrating encounter. Soon after President Trump’s inauguration, Sherman invited a group of leaders from brand-new Indivisible groups to his favorite Sherman Oaks diner, Corky’s, for coffee and a chat. Most of us had been attracted to the Indivisible idea that in order to make change, you need to focus on the people who care most about your votes. But we were mostly novices to political activism. We were thrilled...

    By Dorothy Pomerantz|

  • Columns

    California’s most vulnerable could lose vital services; AB279 can help: Chris Holden and Kathryn Barger

    With the passage of local minimum-wage laws, organizations serving people with developmental disabilities are strained to continue their vital work as the reimbursement rates for those services are set and controlled by the state of California. As they continue to adhere to local mandates without receiving necessary funding, they will soon be forced to shut their doors on a population in dire need of their services. This disaster could be averted with the passage

    By Chris Holden and Kathryn Barger|

  • Opinion

    Editorial cartoon of the day

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  • Columns

    UC’s minimum-wage policy flunks the fairness test: Guest commentary

    Marisol Ramirez is one of more than 80 full-time hospital valet drivers at UCLA Medical Center, most of whom are about to lose their jobs just months after reporting that the low-wage private contractor employing them was paying less than required by university policy. These workers are now fighting to be hired directly by the university. As the first — and often the last — point of contact with UCLA patients, Marisol takes pride in her work. She sees it all:...

    By Kathryn Lybarger|

  • Columns

    Californians should support the Cadiz Water Project: Tony Cardenas and Paul Cook

    California is home to amazing natural resources, a diverse economy and a hard-working population eager to flourish. However, we don’t have sufficient water to meet the needs of all who call California home. That’s why we are both among a broad, bipartisan group of more than 40 federal and state representatives who support the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This project will provide a reliable water supply and is sponsored jointly by public...

    By Tony Cardenas and Paul Cook|

  • Opinion

    Editorial cartoon of the day

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  • Columns

    In attacking Columbus, Serra, activists push Anglo-biased history: Guest commentary

    As the Los Angeles City Council prepares to vote this week to erase Columbus Day, they are contemplating the very thing the Ku Klux Klan called for just under a century ago. The movement to purge public spaces of certain historical figures and icons has reached a fever pitch. Activists have put two such icons in their sites: St. Junipero Serra and Christopher Columbus. Ironically, both men have been the targets of a smear campaign based on an Anglo-centric reading of history. But...

    By Ann Potenza and Patrick Korten|

  • Columns

    Speeding up CSU graduations must not dumb down degrees: Thomas Elias

    The 23-campus California State University system knows it must somehow speed up graduation beyond today’s pace, which sees just 19 percent of entering freshmen graduate within four years. The low rate is at least partly because more than a third of frosh need some remedial work. Increased college graduation is especially crucial in three major regions: the Los Angeles area, the Central Valley and the Inland Empire of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, where need for educated...

    Thomas D. Elias
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  • Columns

    The great transit rip-off: Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing fixation among planners and developers alike for a return to the last century’s monocentric cities served by large-scale train systems. And, to be sure, in a handful of older urban regions, mass transit continues to play an important — and even vital — role in getting commuters to downtown jobs. Overall, a remarkable 40 percent of all transit commuting in the United States takes place in the New York metropolitan area...

    By Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox|

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